Veterinarian



Sessions

Ultrasound as The Initial Imaging Modality for Pelvic Fractures

Severe acute upper hind limb lameness often presents a diagnostic challenge. Ultrasound is frequently the only imaging modality available to diagnose pelvic fractures or coxofemoral disorders in the ambulatory setting but is also highly valuable in the hospital environment. Attendees will learn the basic ultrasonographic approach to the pelvis and coxofemoral joint. Ultrasonographic techniques to diagnose pelvic fractures and other coxofemoral disorders will be presented using 3D simulations of the normal and fractured pelvis with corresponding ultrasound videoclips.

Speaker(s):
Free

New Sepsis Definitions iconNew Sepsis Definitions

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New Sepsis Definitions

The 3rd International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) were published in 2016. This session will take a look at the definitions and discuss what their impact has been on the diagnosis of sepsis and what the implications are for Veterinary Medicine. The session will address the evolution of sepsis definitions and the rationale behind some of the changes. We will discuss where the new definitions have helped and where they fall short, and then look ahead to promising areas of progress.

Speaker(s):
Free

Controversy Surrounding the Rattlesnake Vaccine

This session will be a case-based presentation and review of evidence surrounding use of a rattlesnake vaccine in dogs. The 30-minute presentation aims to be relevant and engaging.

Speaker(s):
Free

Pain: Effects on Patient Quality of Life and Caregiver Burden

Relentless exposure to trauma. A panorama of pain and suffering on loop. What toll will being the reliever of pain have on you?

Speaker(s):
Free

Diagnosis of GI Foreign Bodies: Ultrasound vs Radiographs vs CT

Obstructed or not obstructed? It’s not always an easy question. Join us as we move beyond just radiographs to answer this question. This session will cover imaging characteristics of GI obstruction on radiographs, ultrasound and computed tomography. We will concentrate on image interpretation with an occasional helpful technique for optimizing imaging.

Speaker(s):
Free

Effects of Early Fluid Resuscitation on the Course of Critical Illness

Early intravenous fluid therapy is often a life-saving intervention for patients presenting to the ER or ICU with severe circulatory shock. However, there is growing evidence that what seem like small decisions about the type, rate, and volume of fluid can have substantial impact on the subsequent course of the critical illness. This lecture will review recent evidence in critically ill people, small animals, and laboratory models, with a focus on the systemic effects of fluid therapy decisions. Emphasis will be placed on renal function, acute inflammation, and the endothelial glycocalyx. This will be complimented by an update on the current status of goal-directed therapy and thought on appropriate resuscitation endpoints.

Speaker(s):
Free

Updates in FELINE Blood Types and Pre-Transfusion Compatibility Testing

Beyond the upmost clinical significance of the AB system, significant knowledge gaps concerning blood banking and blood compatibility in cats have been filled, notably concerning the molecular characterization and molecular genetics of the AB system. However, much remains to be investigated especially in regards to naturally occurring alloantibodies (NOAb) and post-transfusion outside of the AB system. Similar to the Mik antigen, there is a need to further characterized the corresponding non-AB related feline erythrocyte antigens (FEA). Based on the presence of NOAb, our research group at the Université de Montréal has recently begin mapping the corresponding FEA behind these incompatibilities and identified five different putative FEA. FEA 1, 4 and 5 were most frequent with a prevalence of 84%, 65% and 96%, respectively. Only FEA 1 was significantly associated with NOAb (P = 0.005), which were observed in 8 of 43 FEA 1-negative cats (19%). Because of its prevalence and association with NOAb, FEA 1 may correspond to the lost Mik antigen. In summary, the session will review the knowledge surrounding the well-characterize AB system, but will also focus the existence and clinical significance of feline erythrocyte antigens beyond the AB system.

Speaker(s):
Free

Updates in CANINE Blood Types and Pre-Transfusion Compatibility Testing

As veterinary care becomes more and more sophisticated, multiple blood transfusions recipients are more common and novel blood groups are likely to be identified in dogs, likewise the discovery of Dal. With the exception for DEA 1 blood typing, accessibility to extended blood typing remains limited even in a research context. In addition, mild immunologic incompatibilities continue to be documented in some transfusion-naive dogs. Should we be concern for our canine patients, i.e. what is the clinical significance of novel blood types and of naturally-occurring alloantibodies in dogs? This presentation will focus on current blood types, update on newer blood types and discuss the significance of naturally occurring antibodies in dogs. In addition, this session will offer practical recommendations on how to prevent and investigate hemolytic transfusion reactions, emphasizing on blood compatibility.

Speaker(s):
Free

Emergency Management of the Blocked Cat - Current Concepts

Obstructive feline idiopathic cystitis is a frustrating problem, particularly because there is a high recurrence rate for obstruction in the first week following an unblocking episode. This session will focus on evidence-based recommendations for preventing recurrence of urethral obstruction in cats with FIC.

Speaker(s):
  • Jaime Burkitt Creedon, DVM, DACVECC, Assistant Professor, University of California-Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine
Free

Viscoelastic Coagulation Monitoring

Viscoelastic testing refers to an assay that uses the viscoelastic properties of whole blood under low shear conditions to provide a dynamic assessment of the hemostatic system. As a whole blood assay providing information relative to the speed and strength of clot formation, viscoelastic testing incorporates cellular and plasma components of hemostasis and identifies hyper and hypocoagulable states, with the added benefit of assessing fibrinolysis. There are currently three viscoelastic hemostatic systems, including thromboelastography (TEGÒ; commonly used in North America), rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEMÒ; used more commonly in Europe), and the Sonoclot Analyzer. Viscoelastic testing is technically more difficult to perform but is thought to provide more a more global assessment of hemostasis compared to the traditional coagulation tests, the PT and aPTT. These plasma-based coagulation tests measure the time to initiation of clot formation, but do not provide information related to ongoing clotting activity, platelet interactions, or fibrinolysis.

Speaker(s):
  • Armelle deLaforcade, DVM, DACVECC, Associate Professor, Tufts University, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
Free